Abdorrahman Boroumand Center

for Human Rights in Iran

https://www.iranrights.org
Omid, a memorial in defense of human rights in Iran
One Person’s Story

Seyed Ahmad Hosseini Arani

About

Age: 32
Nationality: Iran
Religion: Non-Believer
Civil Status: Married

Case

Date of Killing: August 2, 1983
Location: Evin Prison, Tehran, Tehran Province, Iran
Mode of Killing: Hanging
Charges: Unspecified anti-revolutionary offense
Age at time of offense: 31

About this Case

stated in his will, which was written moments prior to his execution: “I write these words in the last moments of my life, and I can say that I am completely calm... I lived my life and at the end of my life, which perhaps could not have been longer, I’m calm, happy and relaxed.”

The news and information about the execution of Mr. Seyed Ahmad Hosseini Arani, son of Ata and Seyed Abbas, along with 19 other individuals, was obtained through Abdorrahman Boroumand Center’s interviews with his wife on June 22 and 26, 2018 (ABC interview) and also the electronic form sent to ABC by Mr. Hosseini Arani’s wife. Additional information in this regard was obtained from a report posted on the weblog “I Don’t Know” on August 13, 2013 by Mr. Shiva Farahmand, a close friend of Mr. Hosseini Arani, ABC’s research, and documents available at ABC such as Mr. Hosseini Arani’s will.

Mr. Hosseini Arani is one of the individuals whose name and date of execution is published in Komala*’s List of Martyrs.

Mr. Hosseini Arani was born on June 10, 1951 to a very religious family in the city of Kashan and grew up in Tehran. Despite the religious restrictions in his family, Mr. Hosseini Arani was not a religious person. He graduated from high school at Alborz School and went to study mechanical engineering at Ariamehr (Sharif) University of Technology in 1969. After graduation, she started working at the Arak Automobile Factory and got married in 1978. Mr. Hosseini Arani resigned from his job after the Islamic Revolution due to his political activities and security issues. He was interested in foreign languages, translated some books from English, and also learned French on his own. According to his wife, Mr. Hosseini Arani was a very patient and diligent person who had a good relationship with others. His friend from university and years after graduation, Mr. Shiva Farahmand, describes him thus: “Ahmad was extremely intelligent. He also had extensive knowledge of science, sociology, politics and arts. He was interested in Azerbaijani and classical music, and he loved art, literature and movies from the Soviet Union. ... Ahmad loved carpentering and was a skilled carpenter. He had made much of the furniture in his home himself.”

Mr. Hosseini Arani started political activities when he was in university and met a number of students at the University of Technology who were from a leftist tendency which had split with the Mojahedin Khalq Organization. After graduating in January/February 1974, he decided to study abroad. His study abroad did not last more than a year, and he returned to Iran. He then joined a group which had split from the Mojahedin Khalq Organization named “Nabard Committee”** and continued his activities with them. During the years before the Islamic Revolution in Iran, he had minimal political activities. However, following the demonstrations and the holding of political campaigns and gatherings after the revolution, he resumed his activities. After the war between Iran and Iraq began, a part of the Razmandegan Organization united with the Komala Party and established the Razmandegan Faction, and Mr. Hosseini Arani joined the workers’ faction of “Razmandgan”, called “Unity, Battle for the Liberation of the Working Class.” ***

Mr. Hosseini Arani was interested in foreign languages, Azerbaijani and classical music, and art, literature and movies from the Soviet Union.

Arrest and detention

On December 12, 1982, agents of the Joint Committee of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard arrested Mr. Hosseini Arani along with his wife at their home in Tehran. Around 5 PM, about six agents of the Joint Committee of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard entered their home, showing them an arrest warrant issued by the [Islamic Revolutionary] Committee on Enqelab Street, though their names did not appear on the warrant.

After about three hours of searching their home and seizing property (including books, family photos, a tape recorder, and recordings), the agents transferred Mr. Hosseini Arani and his wife to the Joint Committee Prison (known as the Tohid Detention Center or Ward 3000), blindfolded and handcuffed.

Mr. Hosseini Arani was tortured during detention. In a short meeting in presence of interrogators, his wife peeked from under the blindfold to see signs of torture by cable beating on both of Mr. Hosseini Arani’s feet.

In April/May 1983, Mr. Hosseini Arani and his wife were transferred to Evin Prison, and Mr. Hosseini Arani was held at Evin Prison until the implementation of the court order.

Mr. Hosseini Arani’s family, who were opposed to his beliefs and political views, never visited him during his detention. During his detention, Mr. Hosseini Arani had only two very brief, chance visits with his wife. On July 14, 1983, Mr. Hosseini Arani met his wife at Evin Prison for the last time. This meeting lasted five minutes, and they were not told that it would be their last. At this visitation, Mr. Hosseini Arani told his wife that his family had not visited him during detention and had requested that his wife ask her own sister to follow up on his case.

Mr. Hosseini Arani’s family, who were opposed to his beliefs and political views, never visited him during his detention.

Trial

No information is available on Mr. Hosseini Arani’s trial.

Charges

The charge(s) brought against Mr. Hosseini Arani is not known. However, Mr. Hosseini Arani and his wife were arrested during the mass arrests of members of political parties such as Tudeh, Komala and the Mojahedin Khalq in the early 80’s.

According to the interviewee, the agents found several packs of cigarettes while searching their home, and told them that “we received information that you are smuggling drugs and we are arresting you for this crime.” The agents also said to Mr. Hosseini Arani and his wife: “Your marriage is not legal and you are forbidden [to marry each other].”

The validity of the criminal charges brought against this defendant cannot be ascertained in the absence of the basic guarantees of a fair trial.  

Evidence of guilt

There is no information regarding the evidence provided against Mr. Hosseini Arani.

The agents said to Mr. Hosseini Arani and his wife: “Your marriage is not legal and you are forbidden [to marry each other].”

Defense

No information is available on Mr. Hosseini Arani’s defense.

Judgment

Mr. Seyed Ahmad Hosseini Arani was executed along with 19 other people in Evin Prison on August 2, 1983. There is no information on the verdict leading to this execution.

Mr. Hosseini Arani’s wife, who was in prison herself, was not aware of Mr. Hosseini Arani’s execution.

Mr. Hosseini Arani’s body was buried in Khavaran cemetery in Tehran. After the execution, his family even refused to take his personal belongings from the prison.

In his will, written moments prior to Mr. Hosseini Arani’s execution, he stated: “I write these words in the last moments of my life, and I can say that I am completely calm... I lived my life and at the end of my life, which perhaps could not have been longer, I’m calm, happy and relaxed” (Documents available at ABC - Mr. Hosseini Arani’s will).

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* Komala: Several remaining members of the Kurdistan Democratic Party of Iran established the Revolutionary Organization of this party in Iraq in the mid-1960s. Esma’il Sharifzadeh, Abdollah Mo’ini, and Molaavareh were among the leaders of this organization who, inspired by the Cuban Revolution, began an armed guerrilla struggle in Kurdistan. When this group was defeated in 1969 and several of its members were arrested, armed struggle was criticized and the Maoist trend overcomes. When some of its leaders were released in 1978, the Revolutionary Organization of Working People in Kurdistan – Komala was established. Based on Marxist theory, Komala was against the capitalists and landlords and encouraged workers and peasants in Kurdistan to an armed uprising against them and the central government. This organization considered the Kurdish Democratic Party of Iran (PDKI) as the rich party and campaigned against it, resulting in several armed conflicts and hundreds dead. In 1982, Komala joined another Marxist group, Sahand, which was basically a theoretical group, and established the Communist Party of Iran. Then it became called the Kurdistan Organization of the Communist Party of Iran – Komala. Years later, this organization separated from the Communist Party of Iran and faced several schisms. The Komala Party of Iranian Kurdistan, led by Abdollah Mohtadi, Komala, and the Kurdistan Organization of the Communist Party of Iran led by Ebrahim Alizadeh are some of these factions.
** Nabard Organization (for the Struggle for the Liberation of the Working Class) was founded by a small group of members after a split in the Peykar Organization in the summer of 1978. There were little or no differences in principle or theory between Nabard and Peykar. Peykar was founded by a number of dissident members of the Mojahedin Khalq Organization who had converted to Marxism-Leninism. The founding tenets of Peykar included the rejection of guerrilla struggle and a strong stand against the pro-Soviet policies of the Iranian Tudeh Party. Peykar radically opposed all factions of the Islamic government of Iran. Nabard’s activities, mostly in publishing, ceased after the government's crackdown on dissidents in 1981.
*** The Razmandegan Organization for the Liberation of the Working Class was founded in the winter of 1979. Its activities were focused on the working class and factories. The founding tenets of Razmandegan included the rejection of armed struggle and a strong stand against the pro-Soviet policies of the Iranian Tudeh Party. It viewed the Soviet Union as a “Social imperialist” state and believed that China had deviated from the Marxist-Leninist principles. Razmandegan was among the groups that became known as “Khat-e Se” (Third line). By early 1981, disagreements on the Party’s position on the Iran-Iraq war caused internal splits in Razmandegan. These splits, which coincided with the massive and brutal repression of dissidents by the Iranian government, caused the Organization to disband.

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